Ancient trees of Mark Ash wood

Headed out at sunrise this morning to enjoy some time amongst ancient trees and woodland wonders!

Starting my walk through the inclosure with views of upright and well organised stands of conifers were a real contrast to stepping off the gravel cycle track and into the woodland ride of ancient trees scattering my path. Sweet chestnuts, beech and oaks reside in these woods along with a handful of impressive yews with their beautiful bark of many colours and shades standing strong guarding the forest. Heading out towards the path the infamous 'eagle oak' can be found It's very unassuming for its age with a high canopy reaching out from the crowded woodland for light. A yew tree embraces it as it suns its branches towards the main track.

Before long I am off the beaten track of Mark Ash wood where you can't help but tread carefully and respectfully amongst the wisdom of the very ancient beech trees. Such grand trees still standing proud and strong as they have done for centuries. Some gnarly and burred with long supporting limbs where squirrels scrabble as autumnal leaves gentle cascade to become the forest carpet. Fungi peppered the forest floor (feel free to enlighten me on the unnamed photos I have taken! 🍄) and fallows were rutting in the distance, it was pretty magical!

Wandering this ancient landscape was a joy and I stopped to admire the different mosses carpeting the old boundary bank of Wooson hill inclosure as the woodland became damper. Before long the moss will become more of the foreground than the backdrop of the changing season. For a moment I had to take my attention away from the trees as I negotiated a wet area and small woodland stream. (Definitely christened the new wellies!)

But not long before I was watching the sun beams through boughs and breathing in the clean, fresh air of young saplings who were sheltered by their ancestors and supporting an abundance of life including mine!



If you would like to join me for this walk in couple of weeks check vents page and book on the "ancient trees of Mark Ash"


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